Category: Blogging

Whales of Icy Strait

July 28-August 3, 2006
$850

In partnership with Discovery Southeast, Alaska Discovery, and the U.S. Forest Service

3 professional development (500 level) credits through UAA.

From the doorstep of Glacier Bay in the rich waters near Point Adolphus, we’ll travel by plane to the gateway community of Gustavus where a boat will transport us to a remote camp on Chichagof Island. Kayaks and boats will be used to move among the humpback whales feeding in the rapid currents and upwellings at the foot of the St. Elias range of peaks. On the water, we’ll watch for marine mammals and sea birds. On hikes through the meadows and bogs of the Tongass National Forest, we’ll explore forest ecology with a naturalist’s perspective. Throughout the course we’ll discuss the impacts of human activity on marine mammals while exploring the landforms, plants, and wildlife that continue to adapt to this remote coastline.

Limited to ten participants.

Seals, Ice, and the Wilderness Idea

June 27-July 3, 2006
$750

In partnership with Discovery Southeast, Alaska Discovery, and the U.S. Forest Service

3 professional development (500 level) credits through UAA.

Experience the calving glaciers and towering granite fjords of Endicott Arm, part of the Tracy Arm Fords Terror Wilderness, southeast of Juneau. From kayaks, we’ll keep a safe distance from Harbor Seals having their pups on icebergs as we consider the effects of humans on sensitive marine mammals. On trail, we’ll study plant succession in a land reawakening from retreating glaciers. In between, we’ll discuss wilderness management decisions as varied as monitoring invasive plants to interpreting wilderness values for diverse audiences. Boats will be used to transport participants from Juneau, but we’ll paddle kayaks between remote campsites of Fords Terror and Dawes Glacier. Course led by Tim Lydon, Wilderness Manager for the U.S. Forest Service in Juneau, and a guide from Alaska Discovery.

Limited to ten participants.

Register for this course through our partner organization, Discovery Southeast, or call (907) 463-1500

Course Details and Itinerary

Students will experience glacial dynamics, harbor seal behavior and wilderness management during a six-day sea kayak expedition in the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness Area on the Tongass National Forest. Boats will transport 10 students and two instructors to a remote location in Endicott Arm, fifty miles south of Juneau. The group will spend six days traveling by stable, double kayaks, moving camp most days. Students will experience a raw, recently deglaciated landscape, wildlife and camping near a tidewater glacier. They will assist with projects relating to wilderness management, including monitoring a harbor seal population during pupping season. Through the experiences, students will explore the history of wilderness preservation, modern wilderness management techniques and goals and methods of incorporating natural resource lesson plans into curriculums.

June 27, 5 PM – 8 PM: Orientation at Alaska Discovery Office in Juneau. Introduce course objectives and expectations. Safety presentations by instructors. Equipment evaluation and discussion.

June 28, 8 AM – 8 PM: Establish camp and introduce sea kayaking. Travel to vicinity of Fords Terror in Endicott Arm. Introduce and practice sea kayaking skills. Introduce natural history of the area and discuss personal definitions of wilderness.

June 29, 8 AM – 8 PM: Paddle to North Dawes Inlet (~15 miles paddling). Longest day of paddling. Students will hone paddling skills. Stopping places will be limited in size and number due to steep fiord walls. Camp will be dramatic outwash in recently deglaciated bay. Interactive discussions will focus on history of wilderness preservation, legal definitions of wilderness and conservation efforts by historical figures such as John Muir, who explored Endicott Arm in 1879.

June 30, 9 AM – 6 PM: Paddle to within one mile of Dawes Glacier, end of Endicott Arm (~8 miles paddling). Moderate day physically, but pushing against wind is possible. Participants will paddle through ice bergs in seal pupping habitat and learn the importance of avoiding disturbance to wildlife while enjoying wildlife viewing. Set camp on very recently deglaciated beach with unobstructed view to active tidewater glacier. Interactive discussions will focus on challenges to modern wilderness management, including heavy recreation, impacts to wildlife and other issues.

July 1, 9 AM – 7 PM: Half of group paddle one mile to hike recently deglaciated valley; half of group paddle two miles to assist in harbor seal monitoring project. Moderate paddling but moderate-to-strenuous hiking off trail. Half of the group will learn about plant succession following glacial retreat while hiking a remote valley unaltered by human activity. Remainder of students will hike to a seal-observation point 400 feet above the fiord through dense vegetation. They will make observations about seal numbers, behavior and habitat needs. Groups will rejoin in the afternoon. Discussions will center on our evolving definitions of wilderness and how Alaskan wilderness is relevant to wilderness preservation in the rest of the nation.

July 2, 9 AM – 7 PM: Half of group paddle one mile to hike recently deglaciated valley; half of group paddle two miles to assist in harbor seal monitoring project. Same as July 1, except the two groups switch destinations and activities. Evening activities include debriefing of the trip and explanations of individual project responsibilities.

July 3: Travel to pickup point at Dawes Inlet for transport back to Juneau by boat.

Final paper/project due: two lesson plans due August 15

Registration:
Register for this course through our partner organization, Discovery Southeast, or call (907) 463-1500

Sculpted by Ice: Geology and Ecology of Chugach National Forest

In partnership with U.S. Forest Service and the Anchorage School District Teacher Academy
3 professional development (500 level) credits through UAA.Teachers will explore the mountains, glaciers, and rainforests of the Chugach National Forest and Prince William Sound by charter boat and on foot.

 The Chugach National Forest, located in south-central Alaska, covers parts of the Prince William Sound, making it a part of a greater forest reserve. The Chugach is one of a kind, which consists of rivers, glaciers, extensive shorelines, and forests that are not invaded by the presence of humans. It houses several species of marine, mammal, and bird species. People are sure to fall in love with this place and the place is considered a good start for those looking for a break, maybe for Bitcoin Trader

We’ll meet with scientists along the way to better understand ongoing research on forest ecosystems, plant succession, and wildlife populations since the oil spill. We’ll consider recreation management and Leave No Trace techniques, then spend our final days developing ways to incorporate forest ecosystems into classroom curriculum. Course led by Dr. Kristine Crossen, Glaciologist, Chair of UAA Department of Geology.

Limited to eleven participants.

Registration
Registration for this course is through the Anchorage School District Teacher Academy at www.asdta.com. Online registration begins March 13. For questions in the meantime, call (907) 868-8639.

Activity Expectations and Physical Fitness
This course is an active learning experience in remote locations in Prince William Sound and the Chugach National Forest. Participants must be capable walkers, in good health, and equipped for Alaska’s often-unpredictable weather (gear list will be included in registration packets). Activities will alternate between boat-based discussion and land explorations. The course is based mostly from two boats (the Babkin and Alexandra), so it will include transfer between boats and onto zodiacs to access the shore. Place-based outings include hiking 1-3 miles at a moderate pace with up to 1,000 feet elevation gain, over uneven, rocky terrain such as tundra and river bars. Though very comfortable, sleeping and space conditions on the boats will be tight. Accommodations beginning Tuesday night through Saturday morning are included in course fees. All meals except one dinner included in course fees.

Course Itinerary

Monday, June 12, 2006, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Dimond High School

  • Course meets at Dimond High School for the kickoff of the Anchorage School District Teacher Academy.
  • Kristin Siemann, Director, Alaska Natural History Institutes, welcome/our role
  • Kris Crossen, introductions, overview of the week, course goals and expectations
  • Stephanie Israel, Lead Interpreter/Educator, USFS, welcome, overview of geography, natural history, and ecosystems of CNF and PWS, team building activity

Tuesday, June 13, 8:30 a.m., Portage Valley and Whittier

  • Teachers will meet at the U.S. Forest Service/Begich Boggs Visitor Center in Portage Valley at 8:30 a.m.
  • 9:30 a.m. drive through the tunnel to Whittier
  • Hike Portage Pass to Portage Lake. Themes: changes in Portage glacier over time; transitions after glacial retreat; human impact on the landscape. This is a 3-mile hike with approximately 1,000 feet elevation gain and loss. Co-led by Keith Rush, observing alpine vegetation en route.
  • Rooms reserved at June’s B&B; in Whittier (cost included course fees)

Wednesday, June 14, 8:00 a.m., Prince William Sound: Blackstone Bay

  • continental breakfast provided through June’s B&B;
  • 7:15 a.m. participants should begin transporting gear to the boat docks to meet the Babkin and the Alexandra
  • 8:00 a.m. boats underway
  • Themes: geography, ecology, human use of Chugach National Forest; earthquake signs
  • 10:30 a.m. Blackstone Bay. Zodiak to shore where we’ll meet Dave Sanders, kayak ranger. Overview of recreation science, human impacts on ecosystem and wildlife, Leave No Trace techniques
  • Afternoon: circumnavigate Willard Island observing Spencer Blackstone ice complex.
  • Themes: tidewater glaciers, glacial differences observed so far

Thursday, June 15, Prince William Sound: Harriman and College Fjord

  • 8:00 course resumes
  • Morning: meet Linda Yarborough, Forest Archaeologist, to hike to Granite Mine. This is a 1-2 mile hike with 700 feet elevation gain through muskeg meadows.
  • Themes: observation of active gold mine, human impacts on ecosystem, human history, peatland ecology
  • Afternoon: meet Bridget Brown, USFS researcher in Harriman Fjord. Themes: black oystercatcher studies; species recovery after the oil spill; importance of baseline data; science for the real world
  • Evening: native populations and human history; naming of glaciers

Friday, June 16, Prince William Sound

  • Still TBD whether we’ll have a full or half day on the boat, but most likely full day with dinner
  • Themes: human history and Harriman expeditions, naming of the glaciers
  • Stop by kittiwake colony on the way back in
  • Aim to be back at dock by 5:30, transfer back to June’s B&B;

Saturday, June 17, Begich Boggs Visitor Center classroom

  • 8:00 a.m. through the tunnel to Portage
  • 9:00 a.m. themes: course summary, curriculum development, specific ways teachers will incorporate experience into classroom lessons; emphasis on meeting statewide standards for Alaska’s teachers
  • led by Stephanie Israel, Lead Interpreter/Educator, USFS, with participation from two additional conservation education specialists: teachers will break into groups according to age level/subject to develop curriculum and classroom plans
  • 3:00-4:30 p.m. group presentations
  • 5:00 p.m. course ends

Final Project due by July 1, 2006

Participants have a choice to do one of the following based on their experience:

  1. Two classroom sessions of lesson plans
  2. One lesson plan and one digital/visual presentation such as an iMovie

Registration
Registration for this course is through the Anchorage School District Teacher Academy at www.asdta.com. Online registration begins March 13. For questions in the meantime, call (907) 868-8639

Click here to order the book. Optional Text – Recommended Reading
Collier, Michael, 2004, Sculpted By Ice: Glaciers and the Alaska Landscape, Alaska Natural History Association, 122 pp.

Bears and Wilderness of Admiralty Island

June 5-11, 2006
$750

In partnership with Discovery Southeast, Alaska Discovery, and the U.S. Forest Service.

3 professional development (500 level) credits through UAA.

Explore brown bear behavior and wilderness management issues by foot and by kayak in the heart of the Kootznoowoo Wilderness in the Tongass National Forest. We’ll travel by floatplane to Staunch Point base camp near the famous Pack Creek Bear Viewing Area. From there, we’ll day paddle to various bear habitats as we explore the needs and vulnerabilities of Alaska’s bears, the importance of wilderness protections, and wise management of human impacts. Kayaking experience not necessary. Participants should be in good physical condition with the ability to hike off-trail on slippery terrain.

Similar to the Crypto VIP Club in the trading industry, the camping club at the Kootznoowoo Wilderness intends to create awareness and a good understanding about the wilderness area in order to ensure it stays that way always. The program also intends to provide some great recreational opportunities without disturbing the natural ecosystems or manipulating it any ways. Some of the benefits of this area is that it provides clean air and water that is not altered by human presence.  

Course led by John Neary, Wilderness Field Manager on Admiralty Island National Monument for the U.S. Forest Service for the past 23 years. He’s led teacher training expeditions to Admiralty Island for 3 years.

Limited to ten participants.

Registration
Register for this course through our partner organization, Discovery Southeast, or call (907) 463-1500

Course Itinerary

June 5, 5 PM – 8 PM: Orientation at Alaska Discovery Office in Juneau. Introduce course objectives and expectations. Bear safety presentation by instructors. Equipment evaluation and discussion.

June 6, 8 AM – 8PM: Establish camp and introduce sea kayaking. Travel to Staunch Point, Admiralty Island by floatplane and establish camp. Introduce and practice sea kayaking skills. Paddle to Windfall Harbor to introduce bear natural history subjects.

Note: the order of the next 4 days (June 7-10) depend upon weather, tides and physical abilities:

Field Day 8 AM – 8 PM:Paddle to Swan Cove & back (~12 miles paddle, 1 mile easy walk). Longest day of paddling. Stop at Swan Island pond to discuss amphibian vulnerability and Swan Island cabin to discuss human structures in Wilderness. End at Swan Point, walk peninsula to find bear sign and human camps. Discuss bear hunting proposals.

Field Day 9 AM – 6 PM: Paddle to Pack Creek (~4 miles paddle, 3 miles easy walk). Easy day physically. Visit habituated bears at Pack Creek viewing area. Meet Forest Service and Fish and Game rangers for discussion of bear viewing management. Walk to viewing spit to see bears eating sedges. Walk to viewing tower to identify bear sign along trail. Discuss wilderness issues in tower as a group. Return to estuary and clam habitat.

Field Day, 9 AM – 7 PM: Paddle to Windfall Estuary (~8 miles paddle, 2 miles walk). Moderate day of paddling. Stop at Win-8 near Middle Creek to discuss commercial crab gear storage and commercial bear viewing operations and their compatibilities/conflicts with Wilderness management goals. Paddle to Windfall CCC shelter to discuss cultural resource management. Walk to estuary to review bear bedding and travel areas. Allow time for reflection and journaling on estuary. Group readings of wilderness writers.

Field Day, 8 AM – 7 PM: Hike in Windfall Harbor (~4 mile paddle, 3-5 mile challenging hike). Mostly hiking off trail to explore upland habitats and discuss appropriateness of trails in Wilderness. Group may be divided by hiking ability with one half doing a shorter exploratory hike near Middle Creek, and one-half on a longer, steeper ascent of a ridge.

June 11, 9 AM – noon: At camp, summarize trip objectives and results. Prepare for plane departure to Juneau.

Final paper/project due: two lesson plans due August 15

Registration
Register for this course through our partner organization, Discovery Southeast, or call (907) 463-1500

Using I-Movie to Capture Interest in Science

June 26-28 ($340.00 per Person)

Register Online
Join Denali Borough School’s Technology Specialist Chris Romine to learn I-movie and unleash the creativity of you and your students! Throughout the country, teachers are learning how I-movie provides a creative tool to learning by engaging students of all learning styles. We’ll discover how I-movie helps students demonstrate abstract concepts, create documentaries of relevant issues and tackle project-based learning. Participants will create I-movie projects during the training.

About This Teacher Training

Murie Science & Learning Center Teacher Trainings explore the vast ecosystems and vibrant cultures of the Far North. Classes are small, but the classrooms are grand – set in Denali National Park’s landscape of taiga forest, glacier-clad mountains, and wide-open tundra. The Murie Science and Learning Center is a new facility dedicated to research and education about America’s eight northernmost National Parks. The Center, developed by the National Park Service, is a collaborative effort of several education and research organizations.

What To Expect

Tent cabin at the Field Camp - click for larger photo. This course is based out of the Murie Science and Learning Center Field Camp, located 35 miles inside Denali National Park in the area of Igloo Canyon. Just below Sable Pass, Igloo Canyon is where the taiga forest gives way to subarctic tundra. From this spectacular location we’ll set out each day to explore Denali’s diverse environments.

The Field Camp includes rustic tent cabins and a common dining tent. All meals, accommodations, transportation, and instruction are included. Family-style meals are simple and healthy. Each tent cabin sleeps four people on platform beds with mattresses. Participants bring their own sleeping bag and pillow case.

This course starts at the Murie Science and Learning Center at the Park entrance. To allow for travel time to Denali, this course begins at 1:00 p.m. on the first day and ends at 4:00 p.m. on the last day.

Programs are limited to 10 participants.

The online trading software also accepts a limited number of participants as it has a 24 hours window. This will lead to a uniform distribution of the income earned from the speculative trading among the investors. Bitcoin trader robot is one such platform that offers a great opportunity for the new investors to explore the world of crypto currencies.

University Credit

University of Alaska Anchorage, offers one professional development credit (level 595) for this Teacher Training. The credit fee is included in the course cost for this Teacher Trainings.

Hiking Distances and Physical Fitness

Field Seminars are active learning experiences. Most involve hiking 1-4 miles with 1,000 feet elevation gain over uneven, rocky terrain such as tundra and river bars. Please inquire about hiking distances for specific seminars. Participants must be capable walkers, in good health, and equipped for sudden changes in weather.

Registration

  • Register online
  • Email: courses@alaskanha.org
  • Call (907) 683-1269 or toll-free (888) 688-1269

Alaska Natural History Association members receive a 10% discount on this course. The discount will not apply towards the UAA credit.

Cancellation Policy:

Course fees, less a $25 processing fee, will be refunded for cancellations 30 days in advance of the course start date. For cancellations within 30 days, the entire fee will be retained unless we can fill your place. If we are forced to cancel a course, your entire fee will be refunded.

Denali’s Dinosaurs: A Teacher Training

July 10-12 ($340.00 per Person)

Register Online
Discover features of habitat and ecology that paint a picture of what Denali may have looked like 70 million years ago. Imagine plant life, water systems, geology, and fauna in a distant time. Join Denali National Park Geologist Phil Brease and Education Specialist Kristen Friesen on this scientific educational adventure. We’ll investigate rocks of the Cantwell Formation, learn how to record geological data, and take home paleoecology lessons for classroom use.

About This Teacher Training

Murie Science & Learning Center Teachers Trainings explore the vast ecosystems and vibrant cultures of the Far North. Classes are small, but the classrooms are grand – set in Denali National Park’s landscape of taiga forest, glacier-clad mountains, and wide-open tundra. The Murie Science and Learning Center is a new facility dedicated to research and education about America’s eight northernmost National Parks. The Center, developed by the National Park Service, is a collaborative effort of several education and research organizations.

What To Expect

Tent cabin at the Field Camp - click for larger photo. This course is based out of the Murie Science and Learning Center Field Camp, located 35 miles inside Denali National Park in the area of Igloo Canyon. Just below Sable Pass, Igloo Canyon is where the taiga forest gives way to subarctic tundra. From this spectacular location we’ll set out each day to explore Denali’s diverse environments.

The Field Camp includes rustic tent cabins and a common dining tent. All meals, accommodations, transportation, and instruction are included. Family-style meals are simple and healthy. Each tent cabin sleeps four people on platform beds with mattresses. Participants bring their own sleeping bag and pillow case.

This course starts at the Murie Science and Learning Center at the Park entrance. To allow for travel time to Denali, this course begins at 1:00 p.m. on the first day and ends at 4:00 p.m. on the last day.

Programs are limited to 10 participants.

University Credit

University of Alaska Anchorage, offers one professional development credit (level 595) for this Teacher Training. The credit fee is included in the course cost.

Hiking Distances and Physical Fitness

Teacher Trainings are active learning experiences. Because we will be seeking out remote and exposed outcrops, hiking on this particular course will be strenuous; 4-7 miles round trip over uneven terrain with as much as 3,000 feet elevation gain. Participants should be in good physical health. We will be bushwhacking through brushy tundra, walking through creeks and rivers and scrambling on steep rocky and exposed terrain. Participants must be capable walkers, in good health, and equipped for sudden changes in weather.

Registration

  • Register online
  • Email: courses@alaskanha.org
  • Call (907) 683-1269 or toll-free (888) 688-1269

Alaska Natural History Association members receive a 10% discount on this course. The discount will not apply towards the $64 UAA credit.

The registration to the online trading tool Crypto CFD trader app is simple and easy. It is a three step process to the financial prosperity. The system was invented by Lenny Hyde, a prominent economic expert. The system uses the principles of artificial intelligence and complex algorithms to predict the price movements and place the trades.

Cancellation Policy:

Course fees, less a $25 processing fee, will be refunded for cancellations 30 days in advance of the course start date. For cancellations within 30 days, the entire fee will be retained unless we can fill your place. If we are forced to cancel a course, your entire fee will be refunded.

Alaska Natural History Institutes

Active education in the Far North for the benefit of people and the environment.

Alaska Natural History Institutes classes are offered in several of Alaska’s premier wilderness destinations. Our small group classes, field courses, and internships are designed not only to teach, but to inspire a renewed appreciation for our public lands and to foster their stewardship for future generations.

In Denali National Park and Preserve we offer our courses through the Murie Science and Learning Center. In partnership with the National Park Service and under our former name, the Denali Institute, has shared Denali with hundreds of students, teachers, families, Alaskans, and visitors for the past six years. We look forward to offering the same high quality educational experiences in Denali under the Murie Science and Learning Center name.

We hope to have you join us soon in on one of our field courses.

With Alaska as our classroom, let Alaska Natural History Institutes be your guide!

Field Seminars: Surrounded by Alaska’s dynamic living laboratory, each Field Seminar takes you on an in-depth exploration into unique landscapes.

Teacher Trainings: accredited courses that are offered all summer in throughout Alaska.

This Last Treasure: Alaska National Parklands (Hard Cover)

Originally published in 1982 to celebrate the new and expanded national parks in Alaska, this re-release is in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA).

President Jimmy Carter contributed a preface for the 2005 release in honor of the historic land conservation act that bears his signature.

You can start to invest in mutual funds with as less as Rs500 and you can thus diversify with such a small amount as well. Thus even with such a meager amount, you can diversify your portfolio. This helps to reduce risk and this lessens the risk of you losing money. This is much better than investing into equities directly.

Mutual funds are liquid. You can take out the money invested any time you wish to. However, make sure to check in case the mutual fund scheme has a lock-in period. There are some tax-saving schemes that usually come with a lock-in period. You can redeem the investment any time you need and at the net asset value. You could also buy more when the market falls and buy the mutual funds unit at a discounted price. This lets you invest and redeem your money at your will.

The equity mutual funds let you invest small sums of money at regular intervals throughout the plan. You can thus do a SIP that lets you invest at frequent intervals. This is simple for the beginners and these small amounts of money would not pinch your pocket too. You not only develop a regular habit of investing in the market but also build a lump sum over a period of time.

If you are investing into the mutual fund scheme for more than a year then the capital gains that you get is limited from tax liabilities. This could, however, be different from one country to another. This could reduce your tax liability to a great extent.

You can know more about this when you trade on the Crypto CFD Trader on your mobile app or on your trading device.

With fresh photographs and a new elegant design complimenting William Brown’s lyrical writing, this book is a keepsake for anyone who loves Alaska’s national parks.

Hard cover, 192 pages, by William E. Brown and published by the Alaska Natural History Association.

ISBN: 0930931688
Price: $40.00 ($34.00 for members)
Qty:
An additional product of interest:
This Last Treasure: Alaska National Parklands (Soft Cover): Soft cover, 192 pages, by William E. Brown and published by the Alaska Natural History Association.

Alaska Bookstore

Welcome to the Alaska Natural History Assocation’s online Alaska bookstore. A wide variety of books, maps, and other products are published or produced by the Association.If the price of the stock on Crypto VIP Club goes high then they sell the stock. Trading helps you to time your market whereas as an investor all that you are focussed on is to create wealth. This is done by compounding the dividend and the interest. To benefit from this you need to hold on to quality stocks in the market for very long terms.

There is risk involved in both trading and investing.  However when you trade you are exposed to higher risk as compared to investing. The returns are also higher when it comes to trading as compared to investing. Investing is an art form it takes some time to develop. The risk, as well as return, is lower in the short term but this could generate higher returns because of compounding and interests if the stock is held for a longer term. The daily movement in the market does not affect the investing decisions.

Trading is a short-term exposure to the market while investing exposes you to the market for a very long term. The traders are skilled players.  They use technical charts to time the market movement and learn what the trend of the market is. This is so as to earn higher profits in the set time period.

Merchandise is in keeping with natural and cultural interpretive themes of Alaska’s public lands.

Discover Alaska Collection

The Association features a variety of hats, pins, and patches from the exclusive collection of logos for Alaska public lands.

Featured Bookstore Items

 

The Last Giant of Beringia: The Mystery of the Bering Land Bridge
The Last Giant of Beringia: The Mystery of the Bering Land Bridge. Author Dan O’Neill. Hardcover, 231 pages, illustrated. Sale price $18.95. Originally $26.00.

The Greatest Good : A Forest Service Centennial Film
The Greatest Good: A Forest Service Centennial Film. 3 Disk Set on DVD includes 300 minutes of additional material. $21.95

American Values, American Wilderness
DVD, color, 57 minutes, ISBN 1931570345. Written and directed by Christopher Barns. Narrated by Christopher Reeve. 2005 High Plains Films.

Denali National Park Pin
By Alaska Natural History Association

One Man’s Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey
223 pp. Soft Cover By Sam Keith from the Journals of Richard Proenneke

Connecting People to Alaska's Natural and Cultural Heritage
Books and educational programs for Alaska national parks and public lands

Books on Alaska & Public Lands Information

The Alaska Natural History Association is your connection to books on Alaska and educational programs for national parks, national wildlife refuges, national forests, state parks, and other public lands in Alaska.

The Association is the nonprofit educational partner of Alaska’s public lands dedicated to sharing Alaska’s rich natural and cultural heritage. The Association is a bookstore, a publisher, an educator, and a supporter of public land educational programs.

Investing and trading are two terms that are most often interchangeably heard of in the financial world. Both of them are related to the creation of wealth in the equity market. However, they are not the same. Investing and trading are different ways in which wealth is created and profit is generated in the market.

In trading, on Tesler App, the stocks are held on to for a very short time period. This could be for a week or even a day. Traders wait for a short-term movement of the stock before they sell it. Investors, on the other hand, buy a stock and hold on to it for a longer time period. Investors keep their money invested in the market for months or even years. Some investors would be invested into the stocks for decades. The short-term movements in the market do not affect the long-term investors.

The traders focus on the movement of price in the market.

You can trust the Association to offer the best available information and books about the natural and cultural heritage of Alaska.
Learn more about the Association’s Educational Programs and Books on Alaska:

A bookstore for public lands in Alaska featuring unique books on Alaska published by the Association and others.

Information, recommended guide books & maps for public lands to help visitors plan their travel in Alaska.

Experiential education courses offered through the Denali Institute, a program of the Association.

Ways to support public lands and the Association’s programs by becoming a member.

If you are searching for an Alaska book, map, or video, then the Association’s Alaska bookstore is a good place to find the latest publications on Alaska national parks and other public lands. The map of Alaska and public land pages offer information on national parks and other public lands in Alaska for travel planning. For each public land, this website provides information, resource links, and recommended guide books and maps for planning your trip and getting the most out of your visit.